Basic Visit is $75

 

After Hours Medical Group
9200 Colima Rd.

Ste. 101
Whittier, CA 90605

 

Main Phone:

562-945-2128

Billing Department:

562-967-3118

 

Hours: 

Weekdays: 2pm-9pm

Saturday: 9am-2pm

Minor Holidays: 9am-2pm

Closed major holidays

 

Connect With Us

Recommend this page on:

Current News 

We at the After Hours Medical Group are a Covid-19 testing clinic site.

If you have  a fever of 100.4 or more and one of the following symptoms of: cough, shortness of breath, or chest pressure, loss of taste,and/or your a health care worker (as defined by the State of California), our office can perform testing for you. 

 

 

Covid-19 vaccine information:

We at the Autumn Medical Group are a Covid-19 testing site.

If you have  a fever of 100.4 or more and one of the following symptoms of: cough, shortness of breath, or chest pressure, loss of taste, and/or your a health care worker (as defined by the State of California), require travel, work, or medical clearance,  our office can perform testing for you. 

Have  you have symptoms of respiratory illness after 2-14 days after exposure?

  • Fever (temperature > 100.4
  • Cough  with shortness of breath
  • Loss of taste
  • Chills,  shaking chills
  • Difficulty breathing
  • Sore throat, body
  • Muscle aches,
  • Loss of taste or smell
  • Loss of appetite
  • Diarrhea
  • Loss of appetite
  • Have you been in close contact with anyone known or suspected to have the COVID-19 coronavirus illness? Close contact is defined as within 6 feet for 3 minutes or more.

If you answered yes to one or more of these questions and have respiratory symptoms:

  • Stay home.
  • If you believe your symptoms are life threatening, go to the nearest hospital emergency department. We recommended that you call the emergency department immediately so the staff can provide you with arrival instructions.
  • If you develop emergency warning signs for COVID-19 get medical attention immediately.
  • Emergency warning signs include:
    • Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath
    • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
    • New confusion or inability to arouse
    • Bluish lips or face

Treatment for people at high risk for getting very sick

If you are at high risk, you may be able to get treatment to help keep you out of the hospital. Contact a doctor right away if you test positive and have symptoms, even if they are mild. Don’t delay: the medicines work best when they are given as soon as possible after symptoms start. See ph.lacounty.gov/covidmedicines for more information.

In Los Angeles County, if you have COVID-19* you are required to:

❶ Isolate yourself, and

❷ Wear a highly protective mask, and

❸ Tell your close contacts that they have been exposed and need to follow instructions for close  contacts

*You are considered to have COVID-19, if you have a positive viral test for COVID-19 and/or a healthcare provider thinks that you have COVID-19.

Call the COVID Info line 833-540-0473 (open daily 8:00am–8:30pm) if you test positive for COVID-19 and have questions or need help. Call this number if you are experiencing homelessness and/or are unable to safely isolate or quarantine at home.

Help slow the spread of COVID-19 in LA County. If you get a call from “LA PublicHealth” or 1-833-641- 0305 please answer the phone. If you get a text message from ‘Los Angeles County Department of Public Health’ with a link for an online interview, please complete it. (See Contact Tracing.)

If you have COVID-19, you must self-isolate regardless of vaccination status, previous infection, or lack of symptoms.1

How long do I need to isolate?

 

 

 

 

 

You must isolate for at least 5 days. How long you have to isolate depends on whether you

have symptoms and if you get a negative follow-up viral test on Day 5 or later. If you test on Day 5 or later, it is better to use an antigen test because NAAT/PCR tests are more likely to stay positive after you are no longer infectious.

Isolation can end after Day 5 ONLY if all of the following criteria are met:

  • You have a negative COVID-19 test** that was collected on Day 5 or later, and
  • You have not had a fever for at least 24 hours without the use of fever-reducing medicine, and
  • Your symptoms are

-OR-

Isolation can end after Day 10 if you have not had a fever for at least 24 hours without the use of fever- reducing medicine.

1 Symptoms of COVID-19 may include: fever or chills, cough, shortness of breath/difficulty breathing, new loss of taste or smell, fatigue, runny or stuffy nose, muscle or body aches, headache, sore throat, nausea or vomiting, and diarrhea. This list does not include all possible symptoms of COVID-19. Some people with COVID-19 never get symptoms. Visit ph.lacounty.gov/covidcare to learn more about what to do if you are sick. Call 911 or go to an emergency room if you are having serious symptoms. Serious symptoms include difficulty breathing, pain or pressure in your chest, have bluish lips or face or being confused or having difficulty waking up.

If you do have a fever, continue isolation until 24 hours after your fever resolves.

For most people, isolation can end after Day 10 even if follow-up COVID-19 viral tests are still positive. This is because many people continue to test positive even though they are not likely to still be infectious.

However, if you have a condition that weakens your immune system or if you were severely ill with COVID-19 you might need to stay home for longer than 10 days. Talk to your doctor about when you can be around other people.

Day 0 is your first day of symptoms. Day 1 is the first full day after your symptoms developed.

*If your doctor initially thought your symptoms were due to COVID-19 (and you did not test positive for COVID-19), but they reassessed your diagnosis and decided that you are not infected, you can stop isolating

after 24 hours of being fever-free. But if you are a close contact to a person with COVID-19 you must follow the on the Instructions for Close Contacts webpage.

**The test must be an FDA-authorized COVID-19 viral test such as an antigen or NAAT/PCR test. An antigen test is preferred. Self-tests are acceptable, but if it is used for return to work the test must be observed or reported in a certain way. For more information check with your employer and see Cal-OSHA Testing FAQs.

Note: Employers may require their employees/contractors to complete the full 10 days of isolation before returning to in-person work. Employees should discuss return to work with their employer. See Return to Work  (Non-Healthcare) Summary Table.

Isolation can end after Day 5 if:

  • You have a negative COVID-19 test* collected on Day 5 or later, and
  • You never got symptoms of COVID-19.

-OR-

Isolation can end after Day 10 if:

  • You never got symptoms of COVID-19.

For most people, isolation can end after Day 10, even if follow-up COVID-19 viral tests are positive. This is because many people continue to test positive even though they are not likely to still be infectious.

However, if you have a condition that severely weakens your immune system you might need to stay home for longer than 10 days. Talk to your doctor for more information.

Day 0 is the day your positive test was taken. Day 1 is the first full day after your positive test was taken.

Important: if you develop symptoms, you must follow the ending isolation instructions for persons with symptoms. Your new Day 0 is the day your symptoms began. See above.

*The test must be an FDA-authorized COVID-19 viral test such as an antigen or NAAT/PCR test. An antigen test is preferred. Self-tests are acceptable, but if it is used for return to work the test must be observed or reported in a certain way. For more information check with your employer and see Cal-OSHA Testing FAQs.

Note: Employers may require their employees/contractors to complete the full 10 days of isolation before returning to in-person work. Employees should discuss return to work with their employer. See Return to Work  (Non-Healthcare) Summary Table.

· Stay home except to get medical care.

  • Stay Do not go to work, school, or public areas. Only leave your place of quarantine to get medical care and don’t allow non-essential visitors. If you must leave home to get needed medical care, wear a highly protective mask. Drive yourself, if possible. If you cannot drive yourself, sit in the back seat alone, leave the windows down, and you and your driver should wear a highly protective mask.
  • If someone from outside your household is shopping for you, ask them to leave the food and other supplies at your door, if Pick them up after the person has left. If you need help finding free delivery services, social services, essential items like food and medicines call 2-1-1 or visit the Public Health resource webpage ph.lacounty.gov/media/Coronavirus/resources.htm.

· Separate yourself from others in your home

If you need to be in the same room as other household members:

  • Wear a highly protective mask (N95, KN95, KF94) or double mask (cloth mask over a medical mask). See below for more
  • Bring as much fresh air into your home as Open windows and use fans to blow air out or use air purifiers to help clear out COVID-19 virus particles. See the California Department of Public Health’s Tips for Reducing COVID-19 Risk Indoors (flyer) and the CDC Improving Ventilation in Your Home webpage for more information.
  • Keep 6 feet If you have to share a room, try setting up the room so that you can stay 6 feet apart, if possible. It is important to stay away from people who are at higher risk of serious illness.
  • Use a separate If this is not possible, disinfect the bathroom after use (see cleaning information below). If sharing a bathroom, open a window or turn on a fan and wait 30 minutes after the person with COVID-19 uses it.
  • Cover your coughs and Throw used tissues in a lined trash can after each use. Wash your hands or use hand sanitizer after you cough or sneeze.

·  Avoid sharing food or personal household items

  • Do not prepare or serve food to others, if Be sure to wear a mask and wash your hands often if there is no one else to prepare and serve food.
  • Do not share dishes, drinking glasses, cups, eating utensils, with other people in your
  • Make sure to wash your dishes, drinking glasses, and eating utensils with soap and water after each

·  Clean your hands often

  • Wash your hands often, especially after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing; going to the bathroom; before eating or preparing food; and after touching your face mask or Use soap and water for at least 20 seconds.
  • If soap and water are not available, clean your hands with a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% Cover all surfaces of your hands and rub hands together for 30 seconds until they feel dry. Use soap and water if your hands are visibly dirty.

·  Clean and disinfect all “high-touch” surfaces daily

  • Clean and disinfect high touch surfaces (e.g., counters, doorknobs, bathroom fixtures, toilets, phones) routinely (at least once a day), especially if you must share spaces with other household Remove personal items from common areas and avoid sharing items.
  • Clean and disinfect any surfaces that may have body fluids on
  • Use household cleaning and disinfectant sprays or Be sure to follow the product label instructions.

While you are in isolation, you must wear a highly protective mask if you need to be around others, including people you live with.

If you meet the criteria to leave isolation after Day 5, it is strongly recommended that you continue to wear a highly protective mask around others, especially through Day 10. Note: if you return to work after Day 5, you are required to wear a mask at the workplace for a total of 10 days after your positive test. See Return to Work  (Non-Healthcare) Summary Table.

highly protective mask is one that fits and filters well such as a well-fitting respirator (such as an N95 or KN95), a double mask (a cloth mask over a medical mask), a well-fitting medical mask, or well-fitting, high- filtration cloth (“reusable”) mask with a nose-wire. Well-fitting respirators provide the most protection.

See ph.lacounty.gov/masks for more details about masks that offer the best protection.

You must tell your close contacts that they could be infected. They must take steps to reduce the risk of spreading COVID-19 including masking, testing, and monitoring their health. Give them the Instructions for  Close Contacts. They are available in multiple languages at ph.lacounty.gov/covidcontacts. Your close contacts must follow the instructions even if they feel well or are fully vaccinated.

If you work or study in a setting where you could have gotten COVID-19 or passed it on to others, please tell your workplace or school so that they can advise others to take any necessary precautions.

Home Care

Most people with COVID-19 have mild illness and can recover at home. Here are steps that you can take to help you get better:

  • Rest and drink plenty of fluids
  • Take over-the-counter medicine such as acetaminophen (Tylenol®) to reduce fever and Note that children younger than age 2 should not be given any over-the-counter cold medications without first speaking with a doctor.

Seeking Medical Care

Stay in touch with your doctor and seek medical care if your symptoms get worse.

People who are at high-risk of getting very sick who get COVID-19 should talk to their doctor about medicine that could prevent serious illness. If you have symptoms of COVID-19 and are age 65 years or older and/or have an underlying medical condition, call your doctor right away, even if your symptoms are

mild. Don’t delay: the medicines work best when they are given as soon as possible after symptoms start. For more information, talk to your doctor and see the medication webpage.

Call 911 if there are emergency warning signs

 

 

 

People with emergency warning signs should call 911. If it’s not urgent, call your doctor before visiting. You

may be able to get advice by phone.

Dealing with Stress

COVID-19 and self-isolation are stressful for people. Visit the Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health’s COVID-19 webpage and the 211LA webpage (211la.org/resources/subcategory/mental-health) for local resources to address mental health & wellbeing needs and concerns. In addition, guidance and resources, including information on crisis hotlines, are also available on the CDC webpage Coping with Stress.

LA County residents have free access to iPrevail.com, an online mental health resource to help with life’s everyday stressors. After a short assessment, you are connected to customized support to meet your needs. Options include:

  • on-demand chat with trained Peer Coaches,
  • self-paced lessons on a variety of topics to improve wellbeing, and
  • community support groups

iPrevail is offered in English and Spanish and is available 24/7 from any smart device.

If you need to speak with someone about your mental health, contact your doctor or the Los Angeles County Department of Mental Health Access Center 24/7 Helpline at 1-800-854-7771. If you need help finding healthcare, call the Los Angeles County Information line at 2-1-1. This number is available 24/7.

Contact tracing is a simple, confidential process that is being used to help slow the spread of COVID-19. You can do your part by answering a few simple questions about the places you have been and the people you have been around while you were infectious.

  • If you get a call or text message from Public Health, it is important that you respond to us as soon as possible. It may show on your phone as “LA PublicHealth” or 1-(833) 641-0305. The text message will be from Los Angeles County Department of Public
    • If you get a call from Public Health, please answer to complete an
    • If you get a text, please click the link to do an online interview or call the number to talk to a
  • Conversations with public health staff are This means any information you share will be kept private.
  • The people you tell Public Health about will be contacted but will not be told your name, contact information, or that you have COVID-19. They will not be told anything about you, just that they were exposed to COVID-19.
  • Public Health staff will answer any questions you may have and will also share helpful resources such as how to get a COVID-19 test, the best time to get a COVID-19 vaccine, or help finding a
  • To learn more about contact tracing, click here.
  • For more information on COVID-19 and to view the resources mentioned above in multiple languages, visit lacounty.gov/media/coronavirus/.
  • For help finding free delivery services, social services, essential items like food and

medicines, visit ph.lacounty.gov/media/Coronavirus/resources.htm or call 2-1-1 (which is available 24/7).

 

 

 

 

 

After You Travel

You may have been exposed to COVID-19 on your travels. You may feel well and not have any symptoms, but you can still spread the virus to others. You and your travel companions (including children) may pose a risk to your family, friends, and community after your travel.

  • Consider getting tested with a viral test 3–5 days after your trip and reduce non-essential activities for a full 7 days after travel, even if your test is negative. If you don’t get tested, consider reducing non-essential activities for 10 days.
  • If your test is positiveisolate yourself to protect others from getting infected.

Also take these actions for 14 days after you return from travel to protect others from getting COVID-19:

  • Stay at least 6 feet/2 meters (about 2 arm lengths) from anyone who did not travel with you, particularly in crowded areas. It’s important to do this everywhere — both indoors and outdoors.
  • Wear a mask to keep your nose and mouth covered when you are in shared spaces outside of your home, including when using public transportation.
  • If there are people in the household who did not travel with you, wear a mask and ask everyone in the household to wear masks in shared spaces inside your home.
  • Wash your hands often or use hand sanitizer with at least 60% alcohol.
  • Avoid being around people who are at increased risk for severe illness.
  • Watch your health: Look for symptoms of COVID-19, and take your temperature if you feel sick.

Follow all state and local recommendations or requirements after travel. 

=======================================================================================

  • How much will patients pay for COVID-19 testing?

    Since the passage of the Families First Coronavirus Response Act (FFCRA) on March 18,2020 most people should not face costs for the COVID-19 test or associated costs. Starting on March 18 and lasting for the duration of the public health emergency, all forms of public and private insurance, including self-funded plans, must now cover FDA-approved COVID-19 tests and costs associated with diagnostic testing with no cost-sharing, as long as the test is deemed medically appropriate by an attending health care provider. This includes high-deductible health plans and grandfathered plans, but does not apply to short-term, limited duration plans. As outlined by CMS in a series of FAQs, there is no limit on the number of COVID-19 tests that an insurer or plan is required to cover for an individual, as long as each test is deemed medically appropriate and the individual has signs or symptoms of COVID-19 or has had known or suspected recent exposure to SARS-CoV-2. Federal guidance does not require coverage of routine tests that employers or other institutions may require for screening purposes as workplaces reopen.

    The Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security (CARES) Act, enacted on March 27, 2020, expanded protections by requiring private plans to also fully cover out-of-network tests. The CARES Act requires health plans to reimburse out-of-network COVID-19 test claims at up to the cash price that the provider has posted on a public web site.  The CARES Act also does not prohibit out-of-network providers from billing patients directly for the COVID-19 test; if that happens, and if the up-front expense is unaffordable, it could deter some patients from getting a test. Otherwise, when providers charge cash up front, it falls to the patient to submit the bill to the health plan for reimbursement.

    Medicare, Medicaid, and private plans also must cover serology tests (blood tests) that can determine whether an individual has been infected with SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19, and developed antibodies to the virus.

     

     Hospitals and other providers may apply to a Cares Act relief fund that has yet to be funded to be reimbursed for care they provide to uninsured patients, subject to availability of funding.  Hospitals and other providers can also decide on a case-by-case basis whether to bill patients or seek reimbursement from the Relief Fund. If providers submit claims for reimbursement from the Relief Fund, they are prohibited from billing uninsured patients.


 


 

  • Our office is not applying for funds from the Relief Fund, and therefore the cost is the sole responsibility of the patient seeking care from our clinic. This insures that we can see each patient in a timely manner and remain fiscally viable to provide the highest standard of care. Our standard price for Covid specific testing is $120 for the 1st visit and for reporting of results. A $70 charge may come from our affiliated lab that runs out tests if the Relief fund fails to pay for the testing.

  • Testing Time: 

    For rt-PCR Nasal Swab  testing Monday to Friday 2:00pm to 6:00pm. Saturday 9:00am-12:00pm .

    Rapid Antigen testing performed 2pm to 8pm weekdays and 9am to 1pm Saturdays for rapid antigen nasal swab testing (results in 10 minutes from an EU FDA approved test which is the most accurate rapid test currently available on the market (100% specificity). Cost for the rapid test is $75 

     

     

    Cost: Special pricing for COVID-19 patients which includes the initial intake, assessment, exam and then reporting of the lab results with explanations of what the results mean and how to proceed with the results given are currently $120. Most major insurances accepted and  may cover rtPCR nasal swab testing. 

  • Expedited Travel testing (excluding Hawaii) with passport number on certificate: (prices based on lab fees)

    • $250 for 48 hour results

    • $270 for 24 hour results

    • $370 for 10 hour rush results. 

  • Travel To Hawaii, Official Testing Site,  instructions
    • Come in for a  Nasal swab for an rtPCR test for Covid-19. 
    • Fill out the paperwork to include the e-mail that you wish to register with us, the lab (Westpac Lab) and the same e-mail that you will register with for the state of Hawaii travel website. 
    • Once the test is completed by the lab you will recieve a link via your e-mail with your QR code to upload to the Hawaii Trusted Testing and Travel Program site that you have registered with. 
    • Send your results to Hawaii via their website
    • Link to Westpac lab travel to Hawaii website: https://www.westpaclab.com/covid-19/hawaii/
    • Link to Hawaii's safe travel registration site:  https://travel.hawaii.gov/#/
    • Link to PDF for Safe travels program: https://hawaiicovid19.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/Flying-Into-Hawaii_103020.pdf
    • Prices for Travel to Hawaii testing are as follows: 
      • $270 for the standard processing time 24 to 72 hours depending on volume at lab (insurance coverage does not  pay for this fee). 
    • Processing time begins from lab pickup time around 7pm. 
    • Test Validity for Hawaii is 72 hours from collection time to flight departure time.
    • Westpac PDF instuctions: 

 

 

Print Print | Sitemap
© After Hours Medical Group